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Planning for Alzheimer’s

The most common type of dementia, Alzheimer’s affects approximately 4 million Americans. The disease is characterized by progressive changes in behavior and personality and can include gradual declines in mental abilities such as thinking, memory or judgment.

Memory loss or forgetfulness is the best-known sign of early Alzheimer’s. This might include difficulty remembering recent events, performing familiar tasks, using words correctly, finding the way home, making decisions, or locating lost objects. A person with Alzheimer’s may frequently lose keys or other objects, forget whether an ingredient has been added to a recipe, withdraw from usual activities, or have trouble driving to a previously familiar destination.

Families whose loved ones have Alzheimer’s face issues they never anticipated. The illness forces changed in the kind of planning they need to do. At first, ensuring that the loved one gets appropriate medical care, emotional support, and companionship assume top priority. Soon, however, other care giving issues arise, including supervision to ensure personal safety and financial security and help with personal care and household tasks. Throughout this time, family members must plan to protect loved ones who may not be able to plan for themselves.

If you or a family member has Alzheimer’s, you are embarking on a journey. You may not know where you’re going when you start out. You can’t always see around the next bend in the road. As you go, some places will offer beauty and sunshine, and others, showers or storms.

Next month, we will discuss the first legal steps to protect your loved one.

For more, call 847-292-1220, e-mail abferraro@abferrarolaw.com or visit www.ABFerraroLaw.com.

About Anthony B. Ferraro

Anthony B. Ferraro is the founder and managing member at the Law Offices of Anthony B. Ferraro. He received his Bachelor of Science degree in accountancy from DePaul University and his Master of Science in taxation. After receiving his CPA designation in 1978, he enrolled in law school, earning his Juris Doctor in 1983 from De Paul University. An elder law practitioner, his practice areas include Medicaid planning and applications, guardianship, probate & trust administration, long-term care planning, nursing home contracts and admission, senior estate planning, special needs planning, estate planning, and estate taxation.